Brian Walshe: More Gruesome Internet Searches Found On Wife’s Murder Case

“Rather than divorce, it is believed that Brian Walshe dismembered Ana Walshe and discarded her body,” Lynn Beland said during the hearing.

Brian Walshe: More Gruesome Internet Searches Found on Wife’s Murder Case - SurgeZirc US
Brian Walshe: More Gruesome Internet Searches Found on Wife’s Murder Case.

Brian Walshe, husband missing Massachusetts woman, made gruesome internet searches with his son’s iPad.

The 47-year-old accused of killing his wife, Ana Walshe, who went missing since New Year’s Day used his son’s iPad to look up how to dismember and dispose of a body, according to a prosecutor on Wednesday at his arraignment of murder and other charges.

“Can you be charged with murder without a body?” was one of the many disturbing searches Walshe made days after he reported seeing his wife last.

Norfolk County Assistant District Attorney Lynn Beland said in Quincy district court on Wednesday that investigators found the couple’s DNA in trash bags in a dumpster at Brian’s mother’s apartment.

They also found a covid vaccination card belonging to Ana Walshe, a hacksaw, cutting shears, and a hatchet.

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The prosecutor revealed in court other Google searches Walshe is believed to have made on his son’s iPad, which include: “10 ways to dispose of a dead body if you very needed to,” “How long for someone to be missing to inherit,” “ Can you throw away body parts?”

A Google search of “Best state for divorce for men,” was also made by Walshe on December 27, days before the disappearance of the 39-year-old mom.

“Rather than divorce, it is believed that Brian Walshe dismembered Ana Walshe and discarded her body,” Lynn Beland said during the hearing.

“What the prosecutors laid out today was an incredible trail of means, motive, actions, affirmative steps taken from the Google searches which were a blueprint of questions,” John Miller, Chief Law Enforcement Agency & Intelligence Analyst told CNN.  “Things he planned to do which he allegedly did.”

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According to Misty Harris, Defense Attorney, “With a no-body murder case, you’re going to be basing this off circumstantial evidence.”

She continued to say that what she expected was exactly what unfolded in the court, “ A map of forensic evidence, and placing Brian Walshe in the locations where that forensic evidence was  found.”

The body of the missing mom is yet to be found, but according to history, a jury may only need enough circumstantial evidence to infer that a victim is dead and the defendant is guilty. Even without a body, a defendant can be charged and convicted of murder.

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